--- About Maine Coon Cats ---

Have a lovely medium haired, silky soft coat of varying lengths and are well built to survive harsh winters, are water resistant.   A Maine Coon’s amazing long plumed tail finishes off the appearance of this magnificent cat.  Their coat will require brushing at least once a week.  During the Autumn, when they shed their summer coats, and spring, when they shed their heavier winter coats, additional grooming is usually needed; at these times I recommend that you send your Maine Coon in for a bath and groom at the parlour as this gets rid of all the old hair.

Come in a large varietyof colour combinations (with the exception of pointed pattern) and two tabby patterns (classic and mackerel).  Brown tabby (also known as classic) is the original colouring of a Maine Coon but the colours range through blues, reds, creams, silvers, solid blacks and solid white.  They have large ears with the loveliest Lynx tips which give them their distinctive “wild” look.  Paws have tuffs which were needed to enable them to run through the snow and icy waters; keeping their paw pads from getting too cold.

Have ahigh pitched trill rather than a meow and can be used in various tones depending on how they want to talk to us; sometimes called chirping noises.

Maine Coons are one of the few breeds of cat that enjoy eye contact.  Most other cat breeds consider eye contact as a sign of aggression.

They are very intelligent, trainable, and “dog like”. They will offer you hours of enjoyment with their antics but can at times demanding of attention. They will want to be part of everything and will follow you everywhere you go.  Most Maine Coons love water, to be in it, watch it, wash their food in it, or just plain play in it, so don’t be surprised if you have an uninvited guest in your shower or Jacuzzi.

Maine Coonsare the largest domestic cat in the world and known as “The Gentle Giants”.  Males weight between 7 and 11kgs and the females between 4 and 7kgs.  Maine Coons are slow growing because of their size and only reach maturity at the age of four.

Your new Maine Coon Cat addition should be kept indoors (if possible), spayed/neutered, fed proper nutrition, provided with clean litter trays and scratching surfaces. And of course, most importantly, showered with love and attention!

Although it is impossible to predict how long your Maine Coon will live, with proper care and nutrition, your Maine Coon should give you many years of love, laughter, fun and friendship.

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Grand Champion Emalini Contessa

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Emalini Tiger Too

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Polydactylism (Extra Toes)

Tiger Giant has two extra toes on each front foot and a full extra toe on each back foot.

As the cattery occasionally breeds polydactyls, we thought that some additional information on this amazing feature of the Maine Coon would be of interest.

I found the following article by Dr. Arnold Plotnick who is a board-certified veterinary internist and feline specialist:

Historically, the original unregistered Maine Coon cats had a high incidence of polydactylism – around 40%! It has been written that the extra toes evolved as a “snowshoe foot” to help Maine Coons walk in the snow, and local folk tales claimed that these cats used their big mitts to catch live fish right out of the streams, taking them home to feed their owners

The original unregistered Maine Coon cats had a high incidence of polydactylism – around 40%! It has been written that the extra toes evolved as a “snowshoe foot” to help Maine Coons walk in the snow, and local folk tales claimed that these cats used their big mitts to catch live fish right out of the streams, taking them home to feed their owners! These stories are charming; however, there is no evidence that polydactylism confers any natural selective advantage to affected cats. Breed standards required a normal foot configuration, and did not allow polydactyl in Maine Coons, and so the trait was deliberately bred out of this breed. In the Netherlands and Belgium, there is currently a move to restore the polydactyl form of the breed.

Normally, a cat has 18 digits. The front paw has five toes – four toes and one dewclaw (the small toe on the medial side of the foot that doesn’t touch the ground). Most polydactyl cats have one or two extra toes on each foot, with the extra toes appearing on the thumb side of the foot. The normal rear paw has four toes.

The gene for polydactylism can give rise to either extra toes or extra dewclaws. Each toe has its own “terminal pad” (the fingertip pad) and often an extension of the palmar pad (the larger pad on the front foot) or plantar pad (the larger pad on the rear foot). It is possible for cats to even have different numbers of toes on each of its front feet! Most cases of polydactylism affect the front feet only. The hind feet are less often affected. When they are, it is usually in addition to having polydactyl front feet. It is quite rare to find a cat with polydactyl rear paws and normal front paws. When polydactylism does occur on the hind paws, it tends to cause extra toes rather than a dewclaw.

There is a lot of variation regarding the number of extra toes and how well-formed they are. The most common form of polydactylism results in cats with well-formed extra toes. Others have an enlargement of the inside digit to a degree that it looks like a “thumb”. This is conventional “thumb cat” polydactyl. Sometimes they only have a tiny little toe between her normal index finger and three-boned thumb.

Because many polydactyl cats carry the gene for normal toes, the trait is never “fixed”. In other words, even breeding two polydactyls doesn’t guarantee all the kittens will be polydactyl. Inbreeding would increase the percentage of polydactyl offspring, but there will always be a few normal-toed kittens in the litter, because of that recessive gene.

The most toes ever found on a cat is 32 – eight on each paw – was reported in October 1974. The current verified record holder is “Tiger”, a 27-toed cat residing in Alberta, Canada. Tiger has seven toes on each front foot, seven on her left hind foot, but only six on her right hind.